sales

The Top Five Tips For Getting Your Business Proposal Selected Over The Competition

August 25, 2015

Writing a business proposal that lands a new client is essential to staying in business over the long term. There are several ways in which you can write a business proposal that will make it stand out from the competition and land the sale. Here are five tips on writing a great business proposal that clients will select.

Focus On Value

With any business proposal, it is important to focus on the value you bring to a customer. Any time you are writing a proposal, always start with how you are going to make their work more easy or profitable. Understanding what the potential customer wants and bringing a solution to their problem is a great way to start out a proposal. Starting with what they want and working backwards is a great way to stand out from competitors.

Include Data

Any time a sales claim is made, it is much more valid if it is backed up with reliable data. For example, instead of saying, "Our company can save you a million dollars per year," use a real example from previous work. It sounds much better to say something like, "Our company worked with a business last year and reduced their operating expenses by ten percent which added $1.2 million to their bottom line." Always relate the examples used back to their core business and how your proposal can improve the profits in their business.

Concentrate on Outputs

In many business proposals, companies simply talk about what they are going to do to improve the business. These are the inputs of the business proposal. However, to write a more effective proposal your company should concentrate on the outputs, or results, of your plan. This will help the potential customer to see the benefits of working with your company. At the end of the day, many business owners want to know how your business proposal is going to make them more money over the long run. Always tie your proposal back to this essential point to increase the effectiveness of the plan and stand out from the competition.

Add A Personal Touch

There are many companies that write thousands of business proposals a year in a quantity over quality strategy. However, if your company takes the extra time to add a personal touch to the proposal the odds of success will increase exponentially. In today's business world that is dominated by online interaction, a personal touch can go a long way to stand out from the competition. Whether it is including a hand written note or mentioning something about the customer, showing that your business has a personal side is a great advantage.

Include a Buffer

Finally, it is important to include different business scenarios in your business proposal. Showing the potential customer that your idea can still be profitable to the business even with unforeseen circumstances can help your company to not over promise on the results. There is always going to be something over time that is unexpected in business. Make sure this uncertainty is accounted for in the numbers somewhere with a buffer.

Sources:
https://www.forbes.com/sites/augustturak/2013/02/18/how-to-write-a-plan-or-proposal-that-rocks/

https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/21834

If you want to give your business a huge competitive advantage when you create your business proposals, use ClientPoint Software. Click here to get a free demo of ClientPoint Software or call us at 888-972-7375.

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